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Posts tagged: news

npr:

newshour:

The Solar Decathlon, hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy, challenges 20 teams from universities to design, build and operate solar-powered houses. These teams work for two years on houses showcased on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.
This year for the first time, cost was a key consideration in the competition.

I went to the Solar Decathlon over the weekend. Neat stuff! I really liked the entry from Appalachian State University called The Solar Homestead. It didn’t place highly in the competition, though. —Wright

 my school is in this! http://www.solardecathlon.gov/scores_teams_parsons_stevens.html

npr:

newshour:

The Solar Decathlon, hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy, challenges 20 teams from universities to design, build and operate solar-powered houses. These teams work for two years on houses showcased on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

This year for the first time, cost was a key consideration in the competition.

I went to the Solar Decathlon over the weekend. Neat stuff! I really liked the entry from Appalachian State University called The Solar Homestead. It didn’t place highly in the competition, though. —Wright

 my school is in this! http://www.solardecathlon.gov/scores_teams_parsons_stevens.html

Around 1 a.m., the first of the protesters held at the Midtown North Precinct on West 54th Street were released. They were met with cheers from about a half-dozen supporters who said they had been waiting as a show of solidarity since 6 p.m. for around 75 people they believed were held there. Every 10 to 15 minutes, they trickled out into a night far chillier than the afternoon on the bridge, each clutching several thin slips of paper — their summonses, for violations like disorderly conduct and blocking vehicular traffic. The first words many spoke made the group laugh: all variations on “I need a cigarette.”

David Gutkin, 24, a Ph.D. student in musicology at Columbia University, was among the first released. He said that after being corralled and arrested on the bridge, he was put into plastic handcuffs and moved to what appeared to be a Metropolitan Transportation Authority bus, along with dozens of other protesters, for over four hours. They headed first into Brooklyn and then to several locations in Manhattan before arriving at the 54th Street precinct.

Men and women had been held separately, two or three to a cell. A few said they had been zip-tied the entire time. “We sang ‘This Little Light of Mine,’ ” said Annie Day, 34, who when asked her profession said, “I’m a revolutionary.” Ms. Day was wearing laceless Converse sneakers: police had required the removal of all laces as well as her belt. She rethreaded them on the pavement while a man who identified himself as a lawyer took each newly freed person’s name.

None of the protesters interviewed knew if the bridge march was planned or a spontaneous decision by the crowd. But all insisted that the police had made no mention that the roadway was off limits. Ms. Day and several others said that police officers had walked beside the crowd until the group reached about midway, then without warning began to corral the protesters behind orange nets.

The scene outside the Midtown South Precinct on West 35th Street around 2 a.m. was far more jovial. Only about 15 of the rumored 57 people had been released, but about a dozen waiting supporters danced jigs in the street to keep warm. They snacked on pizza. One even drank Coors Light beer, stashing the empty bottles under a parked police van. When a fresh protester was released, he or she ran through a gantlet formed by the waiting group, like a football player bursting onto the field during the Super Bowl. “This is so much better than prison!” one cheered.

inothernews:

THE GONE   Joy  Carrington arranges a display of 318 pairs of infant shoes on the steps  of the Arkansas Department of Health  on Thursday in recognition of September as  National Infant Mortality Awareness Month.  The shoes symbolize the 318 infants who died before their  first birthday in the state of  Arkansas in 2009.  (Photo: Stephen B. Thornton / The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette via the AP / MSNBC.com)
This is an arresting photo.  Sometimes you need to see past data and statistics and numbers and see the true health and community impact of something like infant mortality.  It can be devastating.
Read more about efforts to reduce infant mortality here.

inothernews:

THE GONE   Joy Carrington arranges a display of 318 pairs of infant shoes on the steps of the Arkansas Department of Health on Thursday in recognition of September as National Infant Mortality Awareness Month.  The shoes symbolize the 318 infants who died before their first birthday in the state of Arkansas in 2009.  (Photo: Stephen B. Thornton / The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette via the AP / MSNBC.com)

This is an arresting photo.  Sometimes you need to see past data and statistics and numbers and see the true health and community impact of something like infant mortality.  It can be devastating.

Read more about efforts to reduce infant mortality here.

inothernews:

Today in “Really?”

 this is fantastic.

inothernews:

Today in “Really?”

 this is fantastic.

inothernews:

This eBay seller believes he’s found vintage, photographic proof that Nicolas Cage is a vampire — and he’s selling that photo for $1,000,000:

“Personally, I believe it’s him and that he is some sort of walking  undead/vampire, et cetera, who quickens/reinvents himself once every 75  years or so.  150 years from now, he might be a politician, the  leader of a cult, or a talk show host.”

I’ll bid if you bid.
(via the New York Daily News)

inothernews:

This eBay seller believes he’s found vintage, photographic proof that Nicolas Cage is a vampire — and he’s selling that photo for $1,000,000:

“Personally, I believe it’s him and that he is some sort of walking undead/vampire, et cetera, who quickens/reinvents himself once every 75 years or so.  150 years from now, he might be a politician, the leader of a cult, or a talk show host.”

I’ll bid if you bid.

(via the New York Daily News)

npr:

discoverynews:

More Guinness Book Records

And the most dogs ever seen skipping on the same rope numbers 13.

The longest ears of any pooch on record belong to Harbor, a Black-and-Tan Coonhound. Harbor is 8 years old and weighs 40.51 kg (89.2 pounds).

Harbor looks ready to fly away!

If you can hear us, please keep talking to us.

UNIDENTIFIED FLIGHT CONTROLLER, to the crew aboard the Russian Soyuz capsule ferrying three astronauts — two Russians and an American — back to Earth from the International Space Station.  An unexpected “communications blackout,” during which controllers had no audio contact with the capsule, took place as the Soyuz module entered Earth’s atmosphere. 

The incident evoked memories of the doomed NASA space shuttle Columbia, which had undergone a similar blackout in 2003: that ship burned up during re-entry.

It’s unknown what cause the comms failure… but how much longer can we put any trust in the Russian space program?

(Quote via CBS Radio News; article via CNET)

motherjones:

Chart of the Day: The amount that students owe quintupled between 2000 and 2011. For more, check out our MoJo College Guide.

motherjones:

Chart of the Day: The amount that students owe quintupled between 2000 and 2011. For more, check out our MoJo College Guide.